COURSES

Economics and the American Future
(Remote)
 

Instructor(s):
 
Earl Leiken
Retired Mayor of Shaker Heights
Location:  ONLINE
Date:   Tuesdays, September 29-November 17
Time:    10 - 11:30 a.m. EDT


This course will examine the state of the American economy in the context of the 2020 Presidential campaign and the corona virus crisis.

It will include a discussion of the major economic thinkers and basic economic concepts and apply them to the challenges facing the U.S. economy today. Thesewill include issues relating to the consolidation of much of the economy into massive corporate giants,
The problems of inflation, deflation and the business cycle, growing income and wealth disparities, and  the nation’s health care system.

 

The course will explore the present and future impact of the corona
virus crisis and the role of monetary policy, the Federal Reserve and fiscal policy. It will also discuss alternatives to American capitalism, issues of international trade and the U.S. China dispute and the conflicting views of the Presidential candidates as to how best to address America’s financial future.


Required text: The Worldly Philosophers, Robert Heilbroner
This seminar-style course has limited enrollment to allow small group discussion.


MEMBER OF LIFELONG LEARNING COST $90
NONMEMBER COST $105

REGISTER

This course is offered with the generous support of
the Association for Continuing Education (ACE).

The Plague, the Renaissance and the Rediscovery of Antiquity
(Remote)


Instructor(s):


Patrick Moore
Instructor of Lifelong Learning
Location: ONLINE
Date: Thursdays, October 1 - November 19
Time:  1:30-3:30 p.m. EDT


The Black Plague of the 14th century killed at least a third of all the people in Europe within four years.  Many thought that it was the end of the world. Yet, what immediately followed was the Renaissance, the foundation of our modern world. How could that period of art and culture rise from such devastation?
What were the connections? Articles, maps, and excerpts from eyewitness accounts will complement PowerPoint.


Required text: The Great Mortality, John Kelly
This seminar-style course has limited enrollment to allow small group discussion.

MEMBER OF LIFELONG LEARNING COST $90
NONMEMBER COST $105

 

REGISTER


This course is offered with the generous support of
the Association for Continuing Education (ACE).

Crisis and Conflict in American History
(Remote)


Instructor(s)
 
Earl Leiken
Retired Mayor of Shaker Heights
Location: Online
Date: Fridays, October 2-November 20
Time: 10 - 11:30 a.m. EDT


Heading into the 2020 election year, the United States is experiencing what sometimes feels like unprecedented political strife and polarization. This isnot, however, the first time that this country has experienced extreme crisis, conflict, and polarization.
This course will center on the presentation and discussion of other points of contentious conflict in our history and how they were resolved, including: the battle to approve the Constitution, the battle over slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, and the rise of the
Klu Klux Klan, the economic disparities of the Gilded Age, the crusade for women's suffrage, the Great Depression and FDR's New Deal, McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and the struggle for civil rights legislation under Clinton and Obama.


Required text: The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels, Jon Meacham
This seminar-style course has limited enrollment to allow small group discussion.

MEMBER OF LIFELONG LEARNING COST $90
NONMEMBER COST $105

REGISTER

Funny How? Four Decades of Classic Film Comedies

(Remote)


Instructor(s)
 
Terry Meehan
Instructor of Lifelong Learning
Location: Online
Date: Tuesdays, October 6-October 27
Time: 7-8:30 p.m. EDT


This class will take a close look at comedy films from four decades, beginning with the advent of sound in the 1930s. Each class will feature one classic film, but any comedy from that decade is fair game for discussion.
The films are “A Night at the Opera” (1935), “The Philadelphia Story” (1940), “Some Like it Hot” (1959), and “The Graduate” (1967). These films are available online for a small fee, or on DVD from your library.
Viewing the films is suggested but not mandatory; we will view clips from each film during class. Also shown will be clips from “making of” documentaries.  Some Issues for discussion may include why some films are funny, what elements of filmmaking are at work, and how film comedy has changed over the decades.

This seminar-style course has limited enrollment to allow small group discussion.


MEMBER OF LIFELONG LEARNING COST $66
NONMEMBER COST $81

REGISTER


This course is offered with the generous support of the
Association for Continuing Education (ACE).

 

The Second Founding: Remaking the Constitution

(Remote)


Instructor(s)
 
Patrick Moore
Instructor of Lifelong Learning
Location: Online
Date: Wednesdays, October 7-November 11
Time: 1:30-3 p.m. EDT


The American Civil War and Reconstruction led to remaking the Constitution.  The 13th, 14th and 15th amendments freed the slaves, expanded citizenship and gave former male slaves the right to vote.  But
the 12 years that followed the defeat of the Confederacy also set in motion a backlash of racist ugliness – lynching, Jim Crow, the Klan – that still haunts our nation.  With Eric Foner’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book as a foundation, we will explore this crucial period.


Required text: The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the
Constitution, Eric Foner


This seminar-style course has limited enrollment to allow small group discussion.


MEMBER OF LIFELONG LEARNING COST $78
NONMEMBER COST $93

REGISTER


This course is offered with the generous support of
the Association for Continuing Education (ACE).

WINTER 2021


Courses offered with the generous support of the Association for Continuing Education
Course descriptions and registration information available on the Siegal Lifelong Learning Program website (case.edu/lifelonglearning).

WHICH WAY AMERICA, 2021
Joe Konen, Instructor
Wednesdays, January 6-27
10-11:30 a.m.

RUTH BADER GINSBERG: LANDMARK MAJORITY OPINIONS
Barbara Greenberg, Instructor
Tuesdays, January 12-February 2
10-11:30 a.m.

CROSSCURRENTS: BRONZE AGE AEGEAN CULTURES
Jim Lane, Instructor
Tuesdays, January 12-February 16
1-2:30 p.m.

BEOWULF
Paula Kalamaras, Instructor
Tuesdays, January 19-February 23
7-8:30 p.m.

THE PLAGUE, THE RENAISSANCE, AND THE REDISCOVERY OF ANTIQUITY
Patrick Moore, Instructor
Wednesdays, January 20-March 10
1-2:30 p.m.

COMPARATIVE MYTHOLOGY
Paula Kalamaras, Instructor
Thursdays, January 21-March 11
10-11:30 a.m.

BETWEEN THE WARS OR THE TWENTY YEAR ARMISTICE
Patrick Moore, Instructor
Thursdays, January 21-March 11
2:30-4 p.m.

THE AMERICAN LOCAL COMMUNITY AND ITS CHALLENGES
Earl Leiken, Instructor
Fridays, January 22-March 12
10-11:30 a.m.


CARAVAGGIO: THE BEGINNING OF MODERN ART
Charlene Mileti, Instructor
Mondays, January 25-March 15
10-11:30 a.m.

EIGHT LANDMARK CASES OF THE U.S. SUPREME COURT
Barbara Greenberg, Instructor
Mondays, January 25-March 15
1-2:30 p.m.

VINTAGE HITCHCOCK: THE BRITISH FILMS
Terry Meehan, Instructor
Wednesdays, February 3-24
7-8:30 p.m.

THE SPY WHO STAYED OUT IN THE COLD
Shelley Bloomfield, Instructor
Thursdays, February 4-March 11
1-2:30 p.m.

RUTH BADER GINSBERG: LANDMARK DISSENT OPINIONS
Barbara Greenberg, Instructor
Tuesdays, February 16-March 9
10-11:30 a.m.

IT CAN’T HAPPEN HERE: ANTI-FASCISM IN 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE
David Ackerman, Instructor
Tuesdays, March 23-May 11
10:30 a.m.-noon





 

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